Live Captioning Information

  1. Throughout Astronomy Days 2021, live captioning will be provided for all programs, with the exception of videos and movies.
  2. ASL interpreters are available upon request, please contact accessibility@naturalsciences.org at least 72 hours prior to the start of the program.
  3. Spanish captioning will be available on the NCMNS YouTube channel for all archived Astronomy Days 2021 programs.

MONDAY Jan 25th

Diagram of a planet's layers

Learn how planets go from small piles of rubble to large (sometimes habitable) rocky bodies.

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A galaxy with yellow and red lines swirling

Join us for our Citizen Science Adventures video premiere to learn everything you need to know to participate in the Spiral Graph citizen science project so you can make your own contributions to this important research!

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Illustration of two people in the forest looking at the sky.

With the help of planetarium software, we’ll tour the North Carolina night sky and identify planets and stars you can see with just your unaided eye on the next clear night.

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Full Moon with text "Moon Zoom"

The Moon: for millennia, Earth's nearest neighbor has inspired romance, poetry, science, exploration and innovation. Join the Raleigh Astronomy Club and NASA SSAs as we explore the Moon in real time over Moon Zoom!

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TUESDAY Jan 26th

A rocket exploding with fire and smoke

What can go wrong to make a rocket explode or a spacecraft crash? Find out in this special Astronomy Days Natural Sciences Classroom!

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An old photo of two men by scientific equipment

In 1919 Astronomers from two British Observatories travelled to Africa and South America to observe a total eclipse of the Sun. There, they carried out an experiment to test Einstein's predictions that light is affected by gravity and that spacetime is curved by the same force.

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A diagram of orbits

Sure, we send spacecraft all over the Solar System, but how do we know they'll get to where we want them to go? This presentation covers some of the ideas and techniques we use to aim at targets billions of miles away, and get them there successfully.

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A colorful drawing of a brain

It's a special Astronomy Days Edition of Virtual Trivia Tuesday! Sign up to compete against friends and strangers with out of this world trivia questions designed to stretch your mind like matter in a black hole.

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Birds flying in front of the moon

Stars give birds directional guidance for seasonal migrations. Lights may interfere with their routes and pose significant threats along the way. Let's talk about stars, lights and what we can do to help birds along their flyways.

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WEDNESDAY Jan 27th

Artemis on the moon with the earth in the horizon

NASA is preparing to go back to the Moon — this time, to stay. How will this differ from Apollo, and what kinds of new things are we hoping to do this time around?

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InSight mission featuring a spacecraft over Mars. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech..

InSight has been hard at work on Mars for over two years now. Join us for mission updates on the InSight lander and what we have discovered so far!

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A blue sky with Orion's stars shining brightly.

Astronomy collides with yoga! Discover the story behind the Orion constellation while moving through yoga poses!

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An image of a galaxy with the title of the program in white letters and the UNC Physics and Astronomy logo

Wonder what it's like to study astronomy? Ask UNC astronomy students your burning questions.

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THURSDAY Jan 28th

A grid of all the living things that have gone to space

The Supercluster team will be presenting the world's first searchable, interactive database of every living thing that has launched to space.

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Why explore space? 10 NASA Tech Spinoffs.

A view on the benefits and tradeoffs of investing in space exploration given today's economic, social and environmental concerns. Also includes 10 amazing NASA spinoff technologies.

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Night sky with constellations drawn in in blue

Astronomy collides with yoga! Explore Orion and other prominent constellations while moving through yoga poses; natural history connections will also be shared throughout the program.

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The Science Tonight logo with a crescent moon and a photo of the speaker

The End of Everything is a wildly fun, surprisingly upbeat ride to the farthest reaches of all that we know.

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FRIDAY Jan 29th

Planet X art

This entertaining presentation will explore 10 ways that stars (over their life cycles) can cause extinction, injury and harm on Earth.

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Planets with Jupiter in the foreground. Illustration: Joshua Fowler.

Four and a half billion years ago, Jupiter migrated into and back out of the inner solar system, wreaking gravitational havoc upon the planets there. Learn how this made life as we know it possible on Earth.

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Artist's rendition of Perseverance on the surface of Mars.

Learn about NASA's biggest and smartest robot ever — the Mars Rover Perseverance — landing on Mars in February this coming year!

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Artemis program identity

Learn more about the Artemis program: the hardware, science goals, and people including how North Carolina's Astronaut Christina Koch may contribute. Includes behind-the-scenes photos from the rollout of the new SLS rocket and testing at NASA facilities in Louisiana and Mississippi.

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Curiosity selfie 2020

Curiosity has been exploring Mars for 8+ years. What have we learned so far, and what new questions did it cause to be asked?

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Weather at Elysium Planitia on Mars, Dec. 22, 2020.

There's weather in space, on other planets, the Sun and even on the Moon. We'll talk about storms bigger than Earth on Jupiter, sulphuric acid rain on Venus, planet-sized dust storms on Mars and more.

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Different colors of pencils forming a star shape

Grab a pencil and paper and come design your own planet. We'll talk about rings, moons and more!

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A spiral galaxy

Have you ever wanted to talk to an astronomer? Join us for a live Q&A session with Dr. Patrick Treuthardt to learn more about spiral galaxies, what they mean for the study of dark matter, and how you can contribute to astronomical research in this live chat with a scientist!

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Jupiter and its four planet-size moons, called the Galilean satellites, were photographed in early March 1979 by Voyager 1 and assembled into this collage. They are not to scale but are in their relative positions. Credit: NASA/JPL.

The Europa Clipper is designated for a launch in 2023. Find out what NASA's looking for, and how the question; "Is there life on Europa?" will be answered.

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Two silhouettes fighting with light sabers

Join us at our special Astronomy Days installment of Museum Movie Night: Where Science Meets the Cinema, where we will be featuring the genre-defining movie The Empire Strikes Back.

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Text reads: Star Wars Trivia Astronomy Days in Star Wars font with streaming stars (like you are in light speed)

The Universe needs you! Join the Rebellion in this adventure to test your knowledge about the Empire in this super-fun, Astronomy Trivia game! Don't let the Empire distract you from getting the right answers faster than the rest. The winner will get a free Astronomy Days T-shirt, the best in all the Galaxy!

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SATURDAY Jan 30th

Hubble Ultra Deep Field image, cropped. Image credit: NASA, ESA, and S. Beckwith (STScI) and the HUDF Team.

What happens when you take the Hubble Space Telescope and stare at a blank patch of sky for a very, very long time? NASA has done exactly that and we will learn about the Hubble Deep Field images and what they are teaching us about galaxies in the Universe.

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A galaxy rendered in OpenSpace

As a millennium project, the American Museum of Natural History rebuilt the Hayden Planetarium into a whole new way of looking at space. Charting the observed universe in 3D allows us to see it from any position and reconsider if life could only be here and now, or might it be everywhere?

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Astronomy images in space with the title of the program in white letters

Sit down with astronomers to dissect what is true and not true in your favorite astronomy movies!

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The constellations as pictures, such as a swan, a dragon and a lyre

This talk will feature sky stories from around the world, focusing on various cultural interpretations of constellations, the Moon, the Aurora Borealis and more! Note: This talk is directed toward a K-5 audience.

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Orange and yellow protoplanetary gas around star HL Tau

Drake’s Equation can be used to (gu)estimate the number of intelligent, technologically capable civilizations that are out there, somewhere, in the Galaxy today.

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A woman in lab gear by an instrument sampling moon specimens

Lunar samples record the history of how our solar system formed and evolved. Studies of such samples reveal ancient and modern processes important for understanding how the Earth-Moon system formed and evolved.

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Portrait of Jupiter from Cassini.

The giant planets of the Solar System hold some of the greatest mysteries in science. We will explore these mysteries in this program using OpenSpace software, a NASA-funded data visualization project to investigate the cosmos.

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A meteorologist standing by a screen showing planets in the sky

Meteorologists are the scientists of all TV stations. Though their job is to talk about meteorology, many times they are called on to be experts in many other sciences, including astronomy and space science.

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Illustration of a a concept for a possible wind-powered Venus rover.

If we want to go to Venus, we have to completely re-imagine rovers as we know them.

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Text says: Trivia Astronomy Days Edition with an image of the earth with the sun rising behind it

Join the Museum and SAS for a super-fun, rapid-fire Astronomy Trivia game! Test your knowledge of today's Astronomy Days programs and be declared the best in the solar system! The prize for the winner is a free Astronomy Days T-shirt!

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People standing outside an observatory at night

We will control the 32" telescope at DSO and remotely image celestial objects, including Mars, Uranus, the Orion Nebula, the Crab Nebula, the Andromeda Galaxy and our Moon. In the event of clouds we will tour the facility and describe our research.

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SUNDAY Jan 31st

OSIRIS-Rex taking a sample of Bennu

OSIRIS-REx accomplished a key part of its mission in October by collecting its samples from the asteroid Bennu. This presentation will show how it was done and what we have learned, and discuss what challenges remain in the mission timeline.

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Python programming language logo on star field.

All scientists, especially astronomers, need to know how to code. We'll ask an astronomy question and answer it live using the Python programming language using NASA/JPL resources. No previous knowledge needed.

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Hubble & Webb Space Telescopes

Due to launch later this year, Webb is NASA's next flagship space telescope. The telescope is the scientific successor of the famous Hubble Space Telescope, and will reveal many previously unseen facets of our Universe. Please join Dr. Klaus Pontoppidan for a journey through the science of Webb.

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Enrico Fermi at the chalkboard

Are we alone in the Universe? Is there really anybody out there? If so, why isn't anyone returning any our calls? If you've had these questions you're not alone and there just might be a lot of other people like yourself. Come explore the possibilities of life in our galaxy!

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An ancient shoreline inside the Jezero impact crater.

Join a virtual journey into the solar system as we explore the terrestrial planets and our small rocky neighbors — the asteroids and comets!

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A photo of Osiris Rex drilling into Bennu

The NASA OSIRIS-REx mission will return samples from asteroid 101955 Bennu in September, 2023. Dr. Pierre Haenecour will provide an overview of the mission, the current key results, the predicted nature of the collected samples and plans for analysis.

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A man standing with a NASA model

Sam's presentation will be about his path to NASA and the STEM courses that got him there. He'll talk about entering NASA's apprenticeship to learn how to build dynamically scaled model aircraft and spacecraft.

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A photo of Earth rising from the vantage of the moon

Come explore and learn with NASA engineer Alan Sturgis about NASA’s vision and mission to the Moon through amazing iconic photographs and videos. He will inspire everyone to follow their passions whether on Earth or in space.

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A cartoon of a smiling earth and a shooting rocket

Get ready for some out of this world fun as you craft a rocket orbiting in space! Using basic art supplies, kids of all ages will follow a NASA graphic designer as he guides them step-by step how to make this DIY craft. Adult supervision is required and goggles are recommended.

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Legos with a lego astronaut

Show us your LEGO spacecraft creations! In this informal show-and-tell session, we will show off our LEGO creations and tell each other their stories. Feel free to join and see the engineering marvels, even if you have not build your own model. Official models and fanciful creations are all welcome!

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Text says: Trivia Astronomy Days Edition and image is a person in front of a beautiful Hubble image

Join the Museum and SAS for a super-fun, rapid-fire Astronomy Trivia game! Test your knowledge of today's Astronomy Days programs and be declared the best in the solar system! The prize for the winner is a free Astronomy Days T-shirt!

Register