Science Thursdays at the Museum

The Nature Research Center is open late every Thursday until 9 pm.  Science cafes, beginner science classes, special programming and much more!

May 28, 2015

  • Robot Lab
    6:30 pm
    Open
    Fee: 1 person = $10, group of 2 = $18, group of 3 = $24, group of 4 = $28. Groups may be comprised of 2, 3, or a maximum of 4 participants. Please note, robots are not for take home. You will receive plans to make your own robot at home.

May 28, 2015

  • Raleigh Astronomy Club Talk: North Carolina Meteorites
    7:00 pm
    Open
    Fee: Free

    North Carolina Meteorites: Where They Fell, the Different Types, and How to Find Them
    John Sinclair, Curator of Meteorites and MineralsPisgah Astronomical Research Institute

  • Science Cafe: Ecology You Can Eat - North Carolina’s Estuarine Fishes
    7:00 pm
    Open
    Fee: Free

    North Carolina’s estuaries include mosaics of marsh, seagrass, oyster and mudflat habitats that support a diverse assemblage of more than 100 fish species. These fishes come in nearly all shapes, colors and sizes, with fascinating and complex life histories, and many are recreationally and/or commercially prized. In this Science Café, we will highlight some of these cool fishes – many of which seem very exotic even though they are actually quite common members of our estuarine communities, perhaps increasingly so in the case of tropical species.

June 4, 2015

  • Science Trivia!
    7:00 pm
    Open
    Fee: Free

    What’s cooler than absolute zero? Find out at Science Trivia nights at the NC Museum of Natural Sciences, where questions feature a mix of science facts, current news, pop culture and scientific discoveries. Held in the new wing's Daily Planet Cafe on the first Thursday of every month, this is a great opportunity to mingle with friends, compete for prizes and bragging rights ... and perhaps even learn something cool.
    Science Thursdays

June 4, 2015

  • Special Astronomy Lecture: Searching for the Oldest Stars
    7:30 pm
    Open
    Fee: Free

    Take a walk on a moonless night. Watch the Milky Way above, made from a myriad of stars. Did you know that some of them have been shining for more than 13 billion years? These are the oldest, still-surviving objects in our universe. “Stellar archeology” uses Milky Way stars to explore the earliest times in the universe. This work has revealed tantalizing details about the short-lived, very first stars which cannot be studied otherwise. When they exploded as supernovae they left behind individual element signatures in the surrounding gas clouds.

June 11, 2015

  • Computer Programming for Beginners
    6:30 pm
    Open
    Fee: $10 per participant. Friends of the Museum members $8.

    Have you ever wondered how a computer program works? Do you want to make your own computer games and websites? Get an introduction into the exciting world of computer programming with Computer Programming for Beginners. This course is designed to introduce basic programming skills to anyone interested in programming using the free and easy-to-use development environment Microsoft Small Basic. Participants will learn how to translate English into a computer programming language and create simple graphics.

June 11, 2015, June 18, 2015

  • Hunting Dinosaurs (and Diamonds, and Dunes)
    Repeats every week every Thursday until Fri Jun 19 2015 .
    6:30 pm, 6:30 pm

    Open
    Fee: $30 for the series/ $25 for Friends of the Museum

    Authors have long found inspiration in the natural world. Careful observation of the visible world reveals powerful truths about unseen things. Join Piedmont Laureate James Maxey for a two part writing workshop focused learning how to use nature and science as your muse. On the first week, after a brief introduction, students will be sent to hunt through the museum to make detailed observations that will provide the seeds for stories.

  • Hunting Dinosaurs (and Diamonds, and Dunes)
    6:30 pm, 6:30 pm
    Open
    Fee: $30 for the series/ $25 for Friends of the Museum

    Authors have long found inspiration in the natural world. Careful observation of the visible world reveals powerful truths about unseen things. Join Piedmont Laureate James Maxey for a two part writing workshop focused learning how to use nature and science as your muse. On the first week, after a brief introduction, students will be sent to hunt through the museum to make detailed observations that will provide the seeds for stories.

June 11, 2015

June 18, 2015

  • Game Night!
    6:00 pm
    Open
    Fee: Free

    From Ocean-o-poly, Science Bingo and Pandemic to such Throwback-Thursday favorites as Mousetrap, Operation, Clue and Candyland, it’s all about having a great time with friends and family.
    It’ll be casual and free-flowing, from 6–8:30pm every third Thursday in the Micro World iLab. No registration is required, just come join us and have fun!

June 18, 2015

  • Adaptations in Birds and Mammals
    6:30 pm
    Open
    Fee: $10 per participant. Friends of the Museum members $8.

    Using specimens from bird and mammal collections, participants will analyze the similarities and differences in anatomy, form and function between these animal groups. We will then develop hypotheses to account for observed patterns and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of specific adaptations.
    Program Instructor: Dr. Colin Brammer, Co-Coordinator of the Natural World investigate Lab.

June 18, 2015

  • Science Cafe: What Happens When you Flush? Or When you Can’t Flush?
    7:00 pm
    Open
    Fee: Free

    Have you ever wondered what happens to your waste after you use the toilet? We’ll discuss how human waste is treated to protect our rivers, lakes, and streams. What about in other parts of the world? Toilets are not available to 2.5 billion people, and how to deal with human waste is a big technical, social, economic, and even cultural challenge. We’ll discuss how human waste is treated in developed and developing countries, and what kinds of research are being done to help solve the global sanitation problem.

June 25, 2015

  • Marine Invertebrates Dissection Class
    6:00 pm
    Open
    Fee: $25/person (includes all specimens and supplies needed). Children 9 - 15 must be accompanied by an adult. Adult participant, and max. of 1 child age 9 -15, can work together on one dissection kit as a team. Price is based on dissection materials.

    Participants will dissect a squid, a clam, and a blue crab to explore the inner and outer structures of these marine invertebrates. They will locate and identify the internal organs, do a comparative analysis of the 3 different specimens, and learn how scientists classify these animals.
    Program Instructor: Deb Bailey & Christy Flint, Coordinators of the Micro World Investigate Lab

June 25, 2015

  • Robot Lab
    6:30 pm
    Open
    Fee: 1 person = $10, group of 2 = $18, group of 3 = $24, group of 4 = $28. Groups may be comprised of 2, 3, or a maximum of 4 participants. Please note, robots are not for take home. You will receive plans to make your own robot at home.

June 25, 2015

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